Exhibition As Medium 2011-2012

EXHIBITION AS MEDIUM: END SYMPOSIUM

Ruth Beale, Dave Beech, Desmond Church, Noel Cluet, Andrew Cross, Karen Di Franco, Janna Graham, Lily Hall, Toby Huddlestone, Sue Jones, Bob Levine, David Martin, Paul O'Neill, No Fixed Abode, Mette Kjaergaard Praest, Matthew de Pulford, Neal White
 
24 June 2012 at The Showroom, London

This was the final element of the Exhibition as Medium programme. Beginning with Start Symposium in early 2011, the programme and organisation was always perceived as an ongoing active conversation delving into alternate exhibition formats, thinking about the exhibition as one co-authored artwork rather than a space in which to show separately authored works. The programme has attempted to bridge the chasm between the discussion generated through research and process, and the 'final' exhibited product. 

This symposium presented two keynote presentations on possibility and spectatorship by Janna Graham and Dave Beech respectively. Each project as part of the Exhibition as Medium programme was reviewed and discussed by those involved, including Andrew Cross, Bob Levene, Paul O'Neill and Neal White..The symposium ended with a discussion chaired by Paul O'Neill, leading to an open dialogue inviting questions and thoughts from all attendees.

The symposium focused on the research undertaken through the programme via the following questions:

/ How can we breakdown existing hierarchies between organisations, curators and artists, instead finding some commonality of practice and expression?
/ Can we mould collective ideas together in order to co-author and co-produce exhibitions, events and artworks?
/ How can we explore a shift in authorship and control between curators and artists?
/ How can we express artistic practice, rather than just artistic product?
/ Is it more interesting and freeing to ignore ideas around the catagorisation of rigid art practices?
/ Is it more interesting to say 'I am the artist, curator, exhibition, programme and organisation' rather than 'I am the artist'?
/ What is the role of our public(s) when working on conversation-driven programmes? Can we become our own public(s)?
/ What kind of impact do programmes such as Exhibition as Medium have on audience, the art world and culture?

Over 80 thinkers including artists, curators and writers have contributed to the seven separate projects making up Exhibition as Medium, unearthing research and adopting new processes in order to investigate shifts in what the exhibition can be.

EVENT SHOW / THE WAY THINGS GO / A WAY OF DOING THINGS

Ruth Beale, Karen Di Franco, No Fixed Abode, Neal White

Sunday 3 June 3 - 6pm

CRATE presents the last event in the project spaces as part of the Exhibition as Medium programme. You are invited to join us for a series of interconnected events on Sunday 3 June starting at 3pm. Artists Ruth Beale, Karen Di Franco, No Fixed Abode and Neal White present events devised over the last few months via a forecasting technique used during the Cold War called The Delphi Method. These events form the culmination of an anonymous collaborative discussion between the artists, with the curator acting as facilitator through the entire process. The process of using The Delphi Method has allowed the artists involved to incrementally refine their ideas for Event Show, with the suggestion of five separate actions as part of one larger event. They have FORMED A COMMITTEE and issue a summons to attend a WAKE between 3 - 6pm during which time there will be RITUALISED REFRESHMENTS, DIAGRAMMATIC ACTION, PERPETUAL REMEMBERANCE and the UNVEILING OF THE FOUNDATION STONE.

Event Show / The Way Things Go / A Way Of Doing Things is a project that concentrates on collaborative working processes, focusing on research and discussion as major factors in the art-making process, rather than making and showing. It attempts to unravel working and thinking and push these often hidden processes public. Event Show began with a screening of Fischli and Weiss' The Way Things Go. This had lead to A Way of Doing Things, where notions of the natural evolution of ideas and things have become secondary to pragmatism and a sense of wanting to get things done.

The Way Things Go still exists - it was the beginning of A Way of Doing Things - a reference point for discussion and thinking, which has moved on to form something else. We can refer back to The Way Things Were and point towards The Way Things Will Be, choosing to shift philosophical position within the time-frame of Event Show

Fischli & Weiss - THE WAY THINGS GO

Introduced by Jeremy Millar
6 April 2012, 7:30pm

As part of Event Show, Fischli & Weiss' The Way Things Go will be screened at CRATE, with an introduction by Jeremy Millar, CRATE studio artist and author of The Way Things Go, published by Afterall Books.

Event Show / The Way Things Go / A Way Of Doing Things is the final exhibition as part of the Exhibition as Medium programme. It is a project that concentrates on collaborative working processes, focusing on research and discussion as major factors in the art-making process, rather than making and showing. It attempts to unravel working and thinking and push these often hidden processes public. 

TO PAY RESPECT TO THE GENEROSITY OF THE THREE-MINUTE PUNK-ROCK SONG

Vito Acconci, Black Argos, David Blamey, José Arnaud-Bello, Sovay Berriman, Don Celender, Loz Chalk, Rob Chavasse, Adam Chodzko, Desmond Church (with Egle Kulbokaite and Sabel Gavaldon), Patrick Coyle, Andrew Cross, David Cross, Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, Anthony Gross, S Mark Gubb, David Hall, Rose Kallal, Adam Knight, Frank Koolen, John Latham, Jamie Bracken Lobb, Elizabeth McAlpine, Julie McCalden, Ronan McCrea, Magnets, David Martin, Nelson Melo and Carolina Rito, Suzanne Mooney, Lawrence Norfolk and Neal White, Graham Parker, Kelvin Pawsey, Laurence Payot, Pedro Diniz Reis, Andrea Schlieker, Anthony Shapland, Gregg Stobbs, Barry Sykes, Aron Taylor, Sue Tompkins, Gavin Turk, Mark Aerial Waller, Neal White, Carey Young + more.

Exhibition curated by Toby Huddlestone, curator at CRATE 
Events curated by Jim Lockey, curator at LIMBO

18 November - 18 December 2011. Open Fri-Sun 12-6pm

Special Events:
8 November 6pm - late: Opening party & T-shirt sale
29 November 6.30pm: Andrea Schlieker talk
2 December 8pm: Magnets gig
10 December - Screening of Ensemble, Andrew Cross

The three-minute punk-rock song is one of the most generous forms of artistic expression ever created. Lasting just three minutes, it allows us plenty of time both before and after the event to carry on with the rest of what we have to be getting on with.

The punk song is a conceptually tight machine partly formulated by its duration and dedication to punch hard and fast, but therein lays a beautiful contradiction. Within the body of the song are strewn errors, spasms, glorious hic-ups and splutters, reminiscent of our everyday stumblings. The world is becoming increasingly fast-paced and precarious - we know that, but rather than translating this as having detrimental impact on the human race, and foreseeing some kind of neurotic and psychologically broken utopian reality, instead let us embrace this urgency, and the interruptions and blurring that formulate through it.

Let us find the strategies, lines and modes we are most capable of using in order to continue to be culturally inspired and exist. Referring to Agamben's commentary on the absurd notion of 'the holiday', which as a society, we have created as a rewarding break from our everyday working life, we now require shorter bursts of 'away-time', often removing ourselves from daily patterns of life psychologically whilst our bodies remain planted. Many of the artists in this exhibition recognise the poignancy of a wanting for cultural quickness, and the importance of (the word that defines what they do) practice as we continue to re-interpret and re-invent artistic methods to create new associations and commentaries of our present reality. Error making, failure and lapses are crucial to (artistic) practices that are investigative; generous through their efforts to get to grips with something. The works are not one-hit wonders, far from it; like the punk song, they arrest us and reverberate a political stance through us, shuddering us into an altered state forcing recognition and ambition.

NOTES FOR AN EXHIBITION

Open: 21 October - 6 November 2011, Fri - Sun 12 – 6pm
Endview: Sunday 6 November 2011, from 6pm

Artist: Desmond Church
Curators: Daniela Berger, Sabel Gavaldon, Egle Kulbokaite, Lily Hall, Mette Kjaergaard Praest, Laura Smith.

Co-curated by Toby Huddlestone CRATE presents the third exhibition as part of the current Exhibition as Medium programme, Notes For An Exhibition.

Six curators, one artist, one gallery, three weeks. The focus of Notes For An Exhibition will move away from methods of teleological exhibition-making toward action, response and production, emphasizing collaboration and discussion, association and conversation.

Notes For An Exhibition is an experiment that will deliberately be allowed to evolve and change shape. Over the exhibition’s three-week duration, six curators working in pairs will collaborate with the artist Desmond Church. To begin with the gallery space will be empty; throughout the three weeks to come Church will programmatically send each pair of curators a series of proposals for works, actions or instructions. These proposals will be sent to the curators one at a time and will most likely take the form of a drawing or a line of text, which will be interpreted and produced by the curators and finally be displayed alongside the outcome of their directive. The accumulation of these proposals and their outcomes will grow and exist in the gallery as evidence of the collaboration, building almost toward the final production of a Desmond Church solo show.

Notes For An Exhibition therefore seeks to address questions of duration and presence with regard to content and the development of ideas. It also hopes to investigate, or begin to unravel, contemporary ideas around authorship, object/research dynamics and the outsourcing of artistic production, drawing on alternative exhibition histories as inspiration toward its final outcome.

desmondchurch.co.uk

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