Exhibitions

Harry Chapman: DOUBLE PARALLEL

Wednesday 23 November 2016, 5-9pm

CRATE is pleased to present a new work by artist Harry Chapman to kick-off a series of related events that fall somewhere between offering a methodology and means to re-think the positivised 'full-presence' of the performing body, especially when our current social life is being put to work constantly without value.

Double Parallel is a looped projection work predicated on the axiomatic function of moving-image – being both recorded and played back at the same speed. The material of the work is therefore its composition, rather than the time and space which passes for its content.

As a principle or score, Double Parallel maintains a paradoxical relation to the site at CRATE - in which it is both autonomous and contingent on any given future realisation.

To the extent that this work is concerned with an immediate relation between its realisation and its exhibition, its material is synonymous with that of performance; with the difference that it consists entirely of its own documentation.

About the artist:
Since graduating in July 2012 Harry Chapman (b. 1988, graduated Central Saint Martins (BA Fine Art, 4D)) has worked on an independent basis between London and Europe. Whilst studying, the principal form of his work was performance - concerned in particular with non-mediated processes and simultaneity. During the time since graduating Chapman has realised a number of pieces of work on digital video, recorded directly to tape and played back from tape - as well as exhibiting some of his work at an independent space in central London (a.m., 10 Copperfield St.l, SE1 0EL). There is a direct (as opposed to implicit or biographical) relation between Chapman's earlier work in performance, the work on digital video tape, and more recent work made in relation to a score – as at CRATE.

DELUXE FUN LOUNGE: PARADISE 2016

Clarissa Beveridge, Melisa Erol, Ryan Miles & Sophie Taylor

Open Evening: Friday 11 November, 2016. 6–9pm
Open Studio: Saturday 12 - Sunday 13 November. 12-4pm

Deluxe Fun Lounge: Paradise 2016 is opening to the public, presenting both complete and in-progress work.
Taking place at the end of Crate's Graduate Platform Award, the Lounge seeks to develop conversations and discussions concerning each of the graduate’s practices, and is an exciting opportunity for the viewer to participate in their work. The Lounge is a communal space that embraces collaboration, engagement and participation.

For the Open Studio, visitors are invited to engage with the artist’s practices and processes. Having formed a relaxed and informal environment to aid the generation of their work, the artists have considered how the viewer engages with the space. With no blank white walls, the lounge is a working space crammed with tables, sculptures, films, lamps paintings, desks, drawings, rugs, music and chairs.

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist

Machine Room: STRETCHING THE SURFACE

10 - 25 September 2016
Open: Friday - Sunday 12 - 4pm

Machine Room is the research term used in 2006 by artists Mick Finch, Beth Harland, Louisa Minkin and Claude Temin-Vergez. The artists were invited by CRATE to take residence in Margate, and employ the landscapes that they encountered as bases for research. This led to a public display at CRATE, Machine Room: A Blueprint for Painting, and it is this body of research, which is now being responded to for this exhibition. 

This response to that resulting display comes from a group of recent Fine Art graduates, who, for Machine Room: Stretching the Surface, have also considered the dérive, a form of Psychogeography that celebrates the abandonment of intention whilst moving throughout a landscape. 

Clarissa Beveridge, Melissa Erol, Ryan Miles and Sophie Taylor have practices that meet over shared interests in framings, the everyday, material and process, and the viewer’s physical interaction with their work.This exhibition seeks to place the mechanisms and notions of Psychogeography into a contemporary context, placing it within a cultural and technological history of visuality. Utilising their movement throughout Margate and the wider area, the artists have collected pictorial devices embedded in the landscape; look-outs, viewpoints and frameworks.Reading the cultural and architectural ‘eye-catchers’ around the area and building upon their previous experiences and investigations as artists, the four artists are contributing to a broader discussion concerning image seeking and image making.

Clarissa Beveridge defines her practice through attention to material, touch, tone and surface. Seeking to embrace a moment and preserve an action, her work is constantly in process, embracing a visibility of the human hand and forcing the viewer to encounter her decisions in the making.

Melissa Erol employs motifs and gestures that puncture an otherwise colliding combination of ground, colour and form. Working with an archive of objects, images, sketches and collages her work is excited by experience and provoked by the relationship between the frame and the surrounding space.

Ryan Miles explores abandonment and cites this as being key in the beginnings of his work. Responding to the architecture he encounters, works arrive through photography, manipulation and then physical realisation. Using materials such as Perspex and mirrors, there is an allowance for the incorporation of the viewer and the surroundings within the work.

Sophie Taylor responds to everyday visual happenings, approaching an understanding of locations through the patterns and forms that she experiences within them.

Engaging with mundane activities, such as walking or boarding a bus, her work looks to transform these into physical spaces in which the viewer can dwell.
Having employed physical movement to aid the generation of their work, the artists have also considered the way in which we interact with information available to us.
The unending surge of data that we receive, willingly or unwillingly, has formed a new kind of digital landscape throughout which we all pass through.This line of enquiry runs alongisde the original Machine Room research, leading to the development of new works that respond to the physical and the technological world that we inhabit.

Presented as part of the Margate Festival “Sightseeking” 2016

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist
margatefestival.org

Wearing Trousers

Catriona Clayson, Kim Conway, Lucy Crispin, Kat Cutler-McKenzie, Moyra Derby, Eloise Edwards, Emma Gibson, Kate Harrison, Sadie Hennessy, Kellie Hogben, Elizabeth Loughran, Atabey (Carlos) Maria, Nova Marshall, Siobhan McGhee, Jemma Morgan, Jo Murray, Annie Nichols, Lucy Petet, Heidi Plant, Cathy Rodgers, Julia Riddiough, Lizzy Rose, Trish Scott, Heather Tait, Rebecca Taylor, Twinkle Troughton, Charley Vines, Hannah Weatherhead, Newton Whitelaw, Chris Yates

Saturday 12th - Sunday 20th March, 2016 
Open:
 Weekends 12 - 4pm 

POW!Thanet is Thanet's very own festival of celebrations for International Women's Day. Between 8 - 13 March a wide-ranging programme of exhibitions, workshops, parties, film nights, well being events and much more has been put together by a team of dedicated women to bring much needed attention to the cause.

The global focus for this year's International Women's Day is PLEDGE FOR PARITY, so by providing a platform for the female movers, shakers, creatives and voices of Thanet, POW!Thanet is highlighting the very pressing issue of women deserving equal opportunities and earnings to our male counterparts.

Wearing Trousers collects together emerging and established female artists based in Thanet. Remembering the prohibitions that have been imposed upon women in their everyday pursuits to stand as equals alongside men, the works within the show contribute to a wider conversation around the conditions for female artists today.

powthanet.com

Erin Laurel Hayhow & Dream Safari: STRANGE R

Saturday 22nd August - Sunday 13th September
Preview: Friday 21st August
Open: Friday-Sunday, 12pm - 4pm

Engaging with themes surrounding  identity and social identification, Erin Laurel Hayhow and Sam Giles will be occupying Crate to bring their work together, in an investigation of social cultures, both prominent and sidelined.

Dream Safari presents interactive wall pieces that allow visitors to produce compositions through their physical interaction with tribal imagery, whilst Erin Laurel Hayhow creates immersive digital installations that highlight the fragility of cognitive function. and it’s deterioration. 

Both artists are based in Whitstable and have graduated from Fine Art Degrees in the last three years.

This exhibition comes as a commission from Margate Festival: Tribes and is funded by Turner Contemporary, Dreamland and Kent County Council.

erinhayhow.co.uk
dreamsafari.co.uk
www.margatefestival.org

 

 

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