Exhibitions

DELUXE FUN LOUNGE: PARADISE 2016

Clarissa Beveridge, Melisa Erol, Ryan Miles & Sophie Taylor

Open Evening: Friday 11 November, 2016. 6–9pm
Open Studio: Saturday 12 - Sunday 13 November. 12-4pm

Deluxe Fun Lounge: Paradise 2016 is opening to the public, presenting both complete and in-progress work.
Taking place at the end of Crate's Graduate Platform Award, the Lounge seeks to develop conversations and discussions concerning each of the graduate’s practices, and is an exciting opportunity for the viewer to participate in their work. The Lounge is a communal space that embraces collaboration, engagement and participation.

For the Open Studio, visitors are invited to engage with the artist’s practices and processes. Having formed a relaxed and informal environment to aid the generation of their work, the artists have considered how the viewer engages with the space. With no blank white walls, the lounge is a working space crammed with tables, sculptures, films, lamps paintings, desks, drawings, rugs, music and chairs.

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist

Machine Room: STRETCHING THE SURFACE

10 - 25 September 2016
Open: Friday - Sunday 12 - 4pm

Machine Room is the research term used in 2006 by artists Mick Finch, Beth Harland, Louisa Minkin and Claude Temin-Vergez. The artists were invited by CRATE to take residence in Margate, and employ the landscapes that they encountered as bases for research. This led to a public display at CRATE, Machine Room: A Blueprint for Painting, and it is this body of research, which is now being responded to for this exhibition. 

This response to that resulting display comes from a group of recent Fine Art graduates, who, for Machine Room: Stretching the Surface, have also considered the dérive, a form of Psychogeography that celebrates the abandonment of intention whilst moving throughout a landscape. 

Clarissa Beveridge, Melissa Erol, Ryan Miles and Sophie Taylor have practices that meet over shared interests in framings, the everyday, material and process, and the viewer’s physical interaction with their work.This exhibition seeks to place the mechanisms and notions of Psychogeography into a contemporary context, placing it within a cultural and technological history of visuality. Utilising their movement throughout Margate and the wider area, the artists have collected pictorial devices embedded in the landscape; look-outs, viewpoints and frameworks.Reading the cultural and architectural ‘eye-catchers’ around the area and building upon their previous experiences and investigations as artists, the four artists are contributing to a broader discussion concerning image seeking and image making.

Clarissa Beveridge defines her practice through attention to material, touch, tone and surface. Seeking to embrace a moment and preserve an action, her work is constantly in process, embracing a visibility of the human hand and forcing the viewer to encounter her decisions in the making.

Melissa Erol employs motifs and gestures that puncture an otherwise colliding combination of ground, colour and form. Working with an archive of objects, images, sketches and collages her work is excited by experience and provoked by the relationship between the frame and the surrounding space.

Ryan Miles explores abandonment and cites this as being key in the beginnings of his work. Responding to the architecture he encounters, works arrive through photography, manipulation and then physical realisation. Using materials such as Perspex and mirrors, there is an allowance for the incorporation of the viewer and the surroundings within the work.

Sophie Taylor responds to everyday visual happenings, approaching an understanding of locations through the patterns and forms that she experiences within them.

Engaging with mundane activities, such as walking or boarding a bus, her work looks to transform these into physical spaces in which the viewer can dwell.
Having employed physical movement to aid the generation of their work, the artists have also considered the way in which we interact with information available to us.
The unending surge of data that we receive, willingly or unwillingly, has formed a new kind of digital landscape throughout which we all pass through.This line of enquiry runs alongisde the original Machine Room research, leading to the development of new works that respond to the physical and the technological world that we inhabit.

Presented as part of the Margate Festival “Sightseeking” 2016

facebook.com/ClarissaBeveridgeArtist
facebook.com/SophieTaylorArtist
margatefestival.org

Erin Laurel Hayhow & Dream Safari: STRANGE R

Saturday 22nd August - Sunday 13th September
Preview: Friday 21st August
Open: Friday-Sunday, 12pm - 4pm

Engaging with themes surrounding  identity and social identification, Erin Laurel Hayhow and Sam Giles will be occupying Crate to bring their work together, in an investigation of social cultures, both prominent and sidelined.

Dream Safari presents interactive wall pieces that allow visitors to produce compositions through their physical interaction with tribal imagery, whilst Erin Laurel Hayhow creates immersive digital installations that highlight the fragility of cognitive function. and it’s deterioration. 

Both artists are based in Whitstable and have graduated from Fine Art Degrees in the last three years.

This exhibition comes as a commission from Margate Festival: Tribes and is funded by Turner Contemporary, Dreamland and Kent County Council.

erinhayhow.co.uk
dreamsafari.co.uk
www.margatefestival.org

 

 

Sophie Dixon: TIME PRESSURE DECAY

Saturday 15 - Sunday 16 August, 2015, 11am - 5pm

Inspired by her recent residency in the former mining town of Lens, Northern France,Time Pressure Decay is an exhibition by Sophie Dixon of photography, text and research. This coincides with a screening of her latest film 'La Mort De L'Arbre' at Turner Contemporary.

Resonating with the story of the Kent coalfields, the exhibition explores memories of the coal mining industry and the physical traces left upon the landscape. Drawing connections between seemingly disparate fragments of experience, video and text interweave to examine the unifying power of memory.

Dixon's work is rooted in extensive historical, social and cultural research. Concerned with the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction, she deconsructs and expands narratives to explore the tenuous relationship between ourselves and the environments in which we live.

Using personal research and writing as a narrative backbone, her work is less interested in portraying a historic truth than in exploring the deep connections between events across time - an attempt to open up the spaces between the experience of an event, and our later interpretations of it.

In 2014 she was awarded the CVAN Platform Graduate Award and has recently undertaken residencies with Mission Louvre-Lens Tourisme in Northern France and the UK based artists group Blast Theory.

sophie-dixon.com

Leigh Clarke: A HIGHER CANNIBALISM

Events: Thursday 16 July, 6-9pm & Saturday 18 July, 12-4pm
Open: July 17, 23, 24 and 31 & 1 August, 12-4pm. (Or by appointment)

Alongside the CRATE building, LIMBO Space is hosting Dreamlandia, a solo exhibition by David Price with the same opening and private view times.  

For those who are visiting Margate for the day, the Turner Contemporary is hosting Provincial Punk by Grayson Perry and the new Dreamland Vintage Amusement park will be open.

The title of this solo exhibition by the artist Leigh Clarke is borrowed from Rudyard Kipling who described the process of psychoanalysis as ‘ The Higher Cannibalism’.  The project will exhibit new works generated from over 500 popular autobiographies bought in charity shops that Clarke has collected, dissected and altered to make digital prints, etchings, screen prints and collages.

On mass, the collection and combination of the spines confront the viewer with a visual registry of role models that shape contemporary Britain society and question the consumption of popular autobiographies in times of austerity. Clarke plays with the scale of the book spines to measure the importance of celebrity and who is worthy or unworthy of an autobiography. In his method of appropriation, he treats each autobiography spine equally with paint and printing ink, resulting in monochromatic picture plains that remove hierarchies and status.  The exhibition is perfectly located in the CRATE project space, which is an old print works in the centre of Margate. 

About the artist:

Leigh Clarke is engaged in a multidisciplinary print practice that employs mass manufactured objects or mass disseminated text to make singular political statements. His concern with public engagement has led him to curate projects at Lokaal 01 in Breda, The London College of Communication and Extrapool in Nijmegen. In 2012 he was selected for the London Open at the Whitechapel Gallery where he exhibited 30 plaster casts on scaffold poles of the negative spaces within political latex fancy dress masks. In 2014 he took part in a major residency project In Stoke-on-Trent hosted by Airspace Gallery and funded by the Arts Council England and the Esme Fairbairn Foundation. This summer he has been commissioned to work with Create London to generate alternative maps for the River Lea in the East End of London. Clarke is a Senior Lecturer in Printmaking and Illustration at the London College of Communication and Printmaking Tutor at the Royal Academy Schools.

leighclarkeworks.com

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