Exhibitions

The Woodmill - (IN THE DAYS OF THE) ROID

Friday 5 August, 2011.  8pm

For the final part of Solo Show / Group Show, The Woodmill (Alastair Frazer, Naomi Pearce and Richard Sides) present a new play / performance in three parts. 'Roid' is a tragi-com about transformation, epoch, dark psychedelia, death and absurdity. Through a series of monologues, scenarios and prop-based actions this inter-personal edit merges experienced moments and historical events to explore personal dialogue, an idea of coming-of-age, and the 'wrong' psychedelics of Charles Manson.

Feel free to join us from 7pm for a few drinks before the event.

Nearest train - Margate rail from Victoria, St. Pancras and Stratford International. Last trains back to London: 21:53 to St.Pancras 22:16 to Victoria

woodmill.org

SOLO SHOW/GROUP SHOW

Noel Clueit, Bob Levene, David Martin, Dan Meththananda, Woodmill (Alastair Frazer, Naomi Pearce and Richard Sides)

Open: 15 July - 8 August 2011, 12-6pm Friday - Sunday (and whenever an artist is working in the gallery)

A group exhibition presented as a series of cumulative solo exhibitions.

Each artist produces and presents new work in the gallery space at different times during the exhibition, choosing either to use or disregard what has gone before. For the curator, importance is shifted from spatial or thematic concerns towards the exhibition's time frame.

For the artist, this format of group exhibition instigates and supports a much more active decision-making role than usual, asking them to respond physically to others' work in the space, so shifting elements of curatorial (spatial, aesthetic and thematic) control over to the artists. The curator's role becomes insignificant other than setting the initial parameters, passing all control of exhibited product back to the artist. The artist takes on the gallery as a temporary workplace akin to that of a studio, in which they find things already, which they must work with in some way. They do not bring along pre-made works ready to hang on the white walls or place on the floor - instead they become an ongoing work themselves in the space in amongst the visiting public. 

About the artists:

Noel Clueit is based in Manchester, UK. Sampling ready-made or reproduced objects, Clueit utilises shop bought objects, photocopied areas of art history books and appropriated record sleeves - commercial objects that riff between post-painterly abstraction and the purely decorative - altered in order to show their dumbed down 'modernish' appeal. Recent work explores authorship, reproduction and the relationship between reference material and the representation of objects. These materials are sourced in order to explore our unaware attachment to icons, compositions and the shifts of value and taste within contemporary culture. Recent exhibitions include: Burlington Fine Arts Club, Piccadilly Place, Manchester; We Are All In This Together, Bureau, Manchester; Painting Show, Supercollider, Blackpool; DEADPAN, Royal Standard, Liverpool; Legacy 1, Forman's Sculpture Yard / LIU Gallery, London; From This Filthy Sewer Pure Gold Flows, Rogue Project Space, Manchester, A Curriculum, A Foundation, Liverpool; Supercollider Embassy, Grundy Art Gallery, Blackpool; Sunflowers Satellite Gallery, Newcastle upon Tyne. 

Bob Levene, based in Sheffield, UK, “is an artist who embraces the conclusive, ongoing and unpredictable. Her work resounds with a poetic sensibility that defies categorisation, but with a focus on the nature of perception and sound. Adopting pseudo scientific strategies and anthropological methods of recording to analyse the 'nature' of things, she investigates time, distance and communication. In her efforts with limited resources and limited tools, she uncovers with wit and guilefree sincerity a finely balanced poetics of perception that takes us beyond the 'truth' of things into the realm of the absurd” Roger McKinley, Corridor8 Magazine, 2009

David Martin is currently based in Bristol, UK. After graduating from Manchester Metropolitan University in 2004, he has exhibited in the UK, Spain, Scotland and Germany. Recent projects include We Are All in It Together (Bureau, Manchester), Rascals in Paradise (WSM) and Smokescreen (Galerie Art Report and Weltraum Project Space, Munich). David is a Co-Director of Exocet, an arts organisation which focuses its activity outside traditional art venues, and an independent curator, currently organising an exchange project between Cork and Bristol. 

Dan Meththananda was born in Margate in 1985 and currently lives and works in Paris. He studied mathematics at University College London, social sciences at Columbia University and worked in media research for a major American television network before attempting to become an artist in a French business school, HEC, in 2009. He has brown eyes.

The Woodmill was formed in 2009 by a group of artists and curators to establish a dynamic environment for exhibitions and events combined with experimental and communal artists' production space.

nfclueit.com
boblevene.co.uk
dmartin.org.uk
woodmill.org

Tom Duggan: LACUNA

Preview: Saturday 17 April 2010, 6-9pm | CRATE Project Space, Bilton Square, Margate CT9 1DX
Exhibition opening dates and times:
18, 23-25, 30 April 2010 and 1 May, 12-5pm |
CRATE
Project Space
19-23 April 2010, 9am-5pm | Herbert Read Gallery, UCA Canterbury, New Dover Road, Canterbury CT1 3AN

Wherever art appears, life disappears. " Francis Picabia

CRATE presents Lacuna, which documents the actions of a series of personas inhabited by the artist Tom Duggan.

The exhibition, which will take place at CRATE Project Space in Margate and at the Herbert Read Gallery at UCA in Canterbury, comprises performance, installation, found objects and text works.

Lacuna portrays ‘an artist who isolates himself for our spectacle’, regarding the tradition of disappearing artists like Bas Jan Ader and Lee Lozano, while considering, perhaps ironically, how such artists have entered into art history.

In some instances we see Duggan proposing fantasies; in others he seems to be preparing to disappear from the world. Seeming to exist both in fiction and in reality, these works reflect Duggan’s apparently simultaneous desires to be known and to be invisible.

Several of the works make attempts at declaring something. In one instance, Duggan claims to have put everything he owns into cardboard boxes. In another work, that the object exhibited is an item stolen from an undisclosed location somewhere in the UK. These claims are either supported with some kind of proof (if the action took place in the past), or presented as a promise (if it is yet to take place); with each, some aspect of the work is either unseen or unspecified.

In contrast to these declarations and promises are the suggestions of imagined exhibitions curated by the artist, for which he has created a series of press releases and floor plans.

Lacuna considers the presentation of the Tom Duggan artist-persona through this institutional framework and its capacity for revealing truths. It asks whether the viewer will accept the disparity between the Tom Duggan who speaks through the institution and the Tom Duggan who, we are told, carries out the series of secretive, isolated and contemplative acts documented in the work.

Lacuna is part of Bad Translation, CRATE’s programme for 2009/10.  It is supported by Arts Council England and Kent County Council.

About the artist:

Tom Duggan graduated from Nottingham Trent University in 2009.

He once arranged for a follower to follow viewers upon their departure from an exhibition space. Elsewhere, he arranged for actors to visit an exhibition only to pretend to be genuine viewers of the exhibition. Partially in an attempt to question the authority of the artist, these potentially invisible gestures play with the notions of consent inherent to gallery dynamics and etiquette.

Recent exhibitions have included Project Biennale (2009), Nottingham Trent University Fine Art Degree Show (2009) and Defunct (2008), which he co-curated at Backlit Studios in Nottingham.

tomduggan.org.uk

Lucy Harrison: THE ABSENT COLLECTOR

Preview: Friday 12 March 2010, 6-9pm
Open: 13 - 14 March 2010, 12-5pm & 19 - 21 March 2010, 12-5pm (Or by appointment)

For the fifth exhibition in CRATE's Bad Translation programme, Lucy Harrison explores interpretation and coincidence through the stories of two people – one from 20th Century Italy, the other from 19th Century Margate.

In the first part of the show, which takes place in CRATE’s Project Space 1, she attempts to piece together the biography of the owner of a collection of letters and postcards found on a roadside in Sicily.

The London-based artist was visiting Palermo last year when she discovered a carrier bag full of correspondence spanning 20 years. She returned home with the letters, intrigued by what they might reveal of their owner – and what they might withhold. With the help of an Italian speaking friend, she found parallels between the found collection and other ephemera belonging to absent family members which she herself owns. Following this, she asked various Italian speakers in Italy and the UK, including in Margate, to translate more of the letters into English, and also to interpret and speculate on what the letters might have meant and what they reveal about the correspondents’ lives and relationships. Her search for Italian connections in the area led her to a local story that casts a different light on what happens to somebody’s possessions when they die.

In Project Space 2, Harrison investigates a pamphlet found in the Margate Local History Archive. ‘A Plain Statement of a Late Base Conspiracy’ is the confusing story of a man in Margate in 1837 who felt persecuted by gossip in the town about why his uncle cut him out of his will. The gossip was literally spread around the streets by graffiti and ‘printed placards’.

The Absent Collector is Harrison’s investigation into the process by which the belongings of one who is no longer there have new value judgments placed on them and are often disseminated to various locations and read without the previous owner’s knowledge of why they were kept, or of the specific relationships between the objects that determined their meaning. By focusing on the idea of an unknown collector, the project considers how others may find or interpret items that were given away, and the way in which those that were kept now signify a void; the writer or receiver of letters no longer being present to clarify points or retell stories.

Harrison’s dissemination of the Sicilian collection is in part an attempt to explore how personal connections and family histories make objects meaningful: that when her collaborators’ input is gathered to form a new collection, it might create a portrait of the vacuum that is created when someone dies. The exhibition also examines the act of ‘reading’ a collection of objects – whether they be letters, objects, photographs - highlighting the role of guesswork in the absence of the original collector, and the extent to which one’s understanding of collections is guided by one’s own desires rather than curatorial or objective agendas. Furthermore, it considers the impact that this act of reinterpretation can have in the real world.

The Absent Collector is part of Bad Translation, CRATE’s programme for 2009/10. It is generously supported by Arts Council England and Kent County Council.

About the artist:

Lucy Harrison is based in London and graduated from the Royal College of Art in 1999. Her recent work investigates the subjective nature of the experience of place and connections between memory, location and architecture. It takes the form of photographs, book works, video and various forms of printed and published material. Her projects often engage with the public realm through collaboration, encounter and exchange, and involve residents of a place in the work, such as Canvey Guides, a project on Canvey Island in 2007, for which she formed the Rendezvous Walking Club and worked with people on the island to produce an alternative guidebook and audio guide. Recent projects include Fourteen Interventions (2010) at Swedenborg House, Poetry Machines (2009) at the Saison Poetry Library, London, The Stratford Grapevine (2008) for Art on the Underground at Stratford station and a residency at Lokaal 01, Antwerp in 2008. She was artist in residence at the Institute for Contemporary Interdisciplinary Arts at the University of Bath last year, and is developing a new project for SPACE working with residents of an estate in Hackney Wick, London.

Lucy Harrison is Senior Lecturer in Fine Art at University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury.

lucy-harrison.co.uk

S Mark Gubb + Roadkill Zine: HISTORY OF A TIME TO COME

Preview: Friday 12 February, 2010. 6 - 9pm
Open: 13 - 14 February 2010, 12 - 5pm & 19 - 21 February 2010, 12-5pm (Or by appointment)
Plus Zine Fair 20 February 2010, 12-5pm

For the fourth exhibition in CRATE’s Bad Translation programme, S Mark Gubb is teaming up with a hypnotist and East-Kent based fanzine Road Kill to rediscover his youth - specifically, his late teens, which he spent as a heavy metal and hardcore-loving musician and skateboarder in Margate.

For Gubb, as for anyone between the age of seventeen and twenty-one, these were seminal times, when cultural allegiances were formed and rock-star dreams pursued, while the pressures and realities of adulthood approached quietly. Towards the end of this period, Gubb realised that he had to choose between his beloved music and returning to study art. He chose the latter, but the local DIY music and skateboarding subcultures left a strong imprint on his work, which even now is as likely to refer to Napalm Death as it is to the fall of the Berlin Wall.

In fact, Gubb’s work is an exploration of how different subcultures, with their attendant languages, can overlap in contemporary society, creating challenges to notions of independence and originality for those who regard themselves as outsiders (or, indeed, insiders). A single work might find the common ground between the inclusive rhetoric of both the American political right and the independent music scene, but, rather than producing work that critiques this process from rigid ideological standpoint, Gubb explores its potential for good and bad with equal emphasis.

In this new work, he positions himself explicitly as the subject of the actions, decisions and tastes of others – someone whose personal understanding of time and place are part of a larger system of tastes and interpretations. In December 2009, Gubb visited a hypnotist to be ‘regressed’ to his time in Margate. The series of diaristic impressions of the town and the landmarks and events that were important to his time there formed a manuscript, from which Road Kill Zine will be producing a zine and exhibition of drawings.

Road Kill Zine

Road Kill Zine was started in 2007 by Craig Scott and Dan Singer. The pair met skateboarding in Whitstable and Herne Bay, and soon discovered the rich DIY culture and hardcore punk music associated with the sport since the 1980s. Inspired by pioneering hardcore bands Minor Threat and Black Flag (whose singers, Ian MacKaye and Henry Rollins skateboarded together as teens), they adopted the ‘straight edge’ mantra (‘Don’t smoke, don’t drink...), and looked to the illustrators and fanzines associated with the bands for examples of how they might fill their evenings without dulling their minds. Their fanzines, which openly recall the subculture of the decade before they were born, take the classic obsessions of teenage misfits – zombies, sex, mistrust of grown-ups and authority figures - mix them with social commentary and weird humour, and render it all in a surreal anthropomorphic graphic style that reclaims each piece of source material, whether it be a slasher movie or a cheap pornographic image, as the subject of a very idiosyncratic imagination and worldview.

For History of a Time to Come Road Kill have produced a fanzine that takes the results of Gubb’s hypnotic regression and applies their skewed approach to his memories of day-to-day life in Margate, which include relatively quotidian events, such arbitrarily deciding to walk an unfamiliar route to his home. The results are tangential and phantasmagorical; a radical remaking of the past and an exploration of the relationship between Gubb, Scott and Singer; suggesting that illusive acts of the imagination and random thoughts are perhaps more substantive areas of commonality than any verifiable facts that might bind the three together.

In addition to the fanzine, which will be available for free from CRATE for the course of the exhibition, Gubb will work with Road Kill to produce a walk-in version of the ‘zine in CRATE’s project space. This could be seen as an attempt to make real those imaginary works the three have formed together. On the other hand, it could also be regarded as a shrine to the teenage bedroom or artists’ studio...

Zine fair CRATE will be holding an exhibition of fanzines and artists’ books to coincide with History of a Time to Come, featuring contributions from Road Kill – who will be bringing hand-printed hoodies and T-shirts as well as zines – and other self-publishers from Kent, including artist Lucy Harrison, who has a solo exhibition at CRATE in March. Other contributors include Duck and Cover Art Journal and Never Grow Up Zine. Entry is free, and all contributors will have work for sale. Non-contributors are welcome to bring their own fanzines to show and swap.

History of a Time to Come is part of Bad Translation, CRATE’s programme for 2009/10. It is generously supported by Arts Council England and Kent County Council.

Download the zine here

craigquestionsscott.tumblr.com
dansinger.co.uk
smarkgubb.com

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