Machine Room: STRETCHING THE SURFACE

10 - 25 September 2016
Open: Friday - Sunday 12 - 4pm

Machine Room is the research term used in 2006 by artists Mick Finch, Beth Harland, Louisa Minkin and Claude Temin-Vergez. The artists were invited by CRATE to take residence in Margate, and employ the landscapes that they encountered as bases for research. This led to a public display at CRATE, Machine Room: A Blueprint for Painting, and it is this body of research, which is now being responded to for this exhibition. 

This response to that resulting display comes from a group of recent Fine Art graduates, who, for Machine Room: Stretching the Surface, have also considered the dérive, a form of Psychogeography that celebrates the abandonment of intention whilst moving throughout a landscape. 

Clarissa Beveridge, Melissa Erol, Ryan Miles and Sophie Taylor have practices that meet over shared interests in framings, the everyday, material and process, and the viewer’s physical interaction with their work.This exhibition seeks to place the mechanisms and notions of Psychogeography into a contemporary context, placing it within a cultural and technological history of visuality. Utilising their movement throughout Margate and the wider area, the artists have collected pictorial devices embedded in the landscape; look-outs, viewpoints and frameworks.Reading the cultural and architectural ‘eye-catchers’ around the area and building upon their previous experiences and investigations as artists, the four artists are contributing to a broader discussion concerning image seeking and image making.

Clarissa Beveridge defines her practice through attention to material, touch, tone and surface. Seeking to embrace a moment and preserve an action, her work is constantly in process, embracing a visibility of the human hand and forcing the viewer to encounter her decisions in the making.

Melissa Erol employs motifs and gestures that puncture an otherwise colliding combination of ground, colour and form. Working with an archive of objects, images, sketches and collages her work is excited by experience and provoked by the relationship between the frame and the surrounding space.

Ryan Miles explores abandonment and cites this as being key in the beginnings of his work. Responding to the architecture he encounters, works arrive through photography, manipulation and then physical realisation. Using materials such as Perspex and mirrors, there is an allowance for the incorporation of the viewer and the surroundings within the work.

Sophie Taylor responds to everyday visual happenings, approaching an understanding of locations through the patterns and forms that she experiences within them.

Engaging with mundane activities, such as walking or boarding a bus, her work looks to transform these into physical spaces in which the viewer can dwell.
Having employed physical movement to aid the generation of their work, the artists have also considered the way in which we interact with information available to us.
The unending surge of data that we receive, willingly or unwillingly, has formed a new kind of digital landscape throughout which we all pass through.This line of enquiry runs alongisde the original Machine Room research, leading to the development of new works that respond to the physical and the technological world that we inhabit.

Presented as part of the Margate Festival “Sightseeking” 2016



Wearing Trousers

Catriona Clayson, Kim Conway, Lucy Crispin, Kat Cutler-McKenzie, Moyra Derby, Eloise Edwards, Emma Gibson, Kate Harrison, Sadie Hennessy, Kellie Hogben, Elizabeth Loughran, Atabey (Carlos) Maria, Nova Marshall, Siobhan McGhee, Jemma Morgan, Jo Murray, Annie Nichols, Lucy Petet, Heidi Plant, Cathy Rodgers, Julia Riddiough, Lizzy Rose, Trish Scott, Heather Tait, Rebecca Taylor, Twinkle Troughton, Charley Vines, Hannah Weatherhead, Newton Whitelaw, Chris Yates

Saturday 12th - Sunday 20th March, 2016 
Open:
 Weekends 12 - 4pm 

POW!Thanet is Thanet's very own festival of celebrations for International Women's Day. Between 8 - 13 March a wide-ranging programme of exhibitions, workshops, parties, film nights, well being events and much more has been put together by a team of dedicated women to bring much needed attention to the cause.

The global focus for this year's International Women's Day is PLEDGE FOR PARITY, so by providing a platform for the female movers, shakers, creatives and voices of Thanet, POW!Thanet is highlighting the very pressing issue of women deserving equal opportunities and earnings to our male counterparts.

Wearing Trousers collects together emerging and established female artists based in Thanet. Remembering the prohibitions that have been imposed upon women in their everyday pursuits to stand as equals alongside men, the works within the show contribute to a wider conversation around the conditions for female artists today.

powthanet.com

Emma Gibson: SHELLING OUT

Preview: October 23, 7 - 9pm October 24 - November 1, 2015

Part of an ongoing series of environments known as "The Other Room", this new exhibition by Emma Gibson uses a
backdrop of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics to pinpoint a turning of the tide, when things that
were once child's playthings on the beach came to have the price of jewels.

Conchlymania or ‘shell-lunacy’ in the 17th century referred to the hysteria around collecting, acquiring and dealing these ‘works of art from God’. 

Collections became declarations of wealth and faith (the gathering of shells on the beach coffered spiritual status) and the collectors themselves had surprising similarities to dealers and collectors of fine art today- both caring passionately for the status of possessing something strange and unusual from a distant land, preferably before anyone else.

Seashells are naturally occurring and no two shells are ever alike.

Presented inside this parallel universe are two areas, one Production and one Display. Using seashells and their complex and once extremely coveted natural beauty and mythology as a metaphor, it confronts how we consider value and originality today.It is up to you to decide on the origins and meaning of these shells and ultimately, if they have worth.

egibson.co.uk

CRATE Graduate Project Space Award Artists: Madeline Jones

   

MADELINE JONES

In recent work, Madeline has been questioning the balance between what is real and what is a projection of she subconscious. She has been investigating how perception of the natural environment may be affected by viewing it through digital media, and how this may lead to disengagement with it. She has been interested in the way that mobile phones are used as a form of visual memory, and how they are used to curate personal histories as well as informing us of our cultural identities. 

Madeline uses mobile phones, predominantly, to construct her work, which are then edited within a range of installation sites. She selects sites depending on their intimacy, hoping to reflect the visual viewpoint enforced by mobile devices. Works can be viewed from within an installation, making visible the mechanics of its construction. 

 

CRATE Graduate Project Space Award Artists: Layla Moore

LAYLA MOORE

Materials used in construction and tactile household situations form the basis of Layla's adhoc modular sculptures. She aims to subvert the role of the object in art by inviting apparent functionality back into sculpture. With them she investigates the commodification of objects and questions how 'usefulness' and 'need' do not correlate in modern society.

She is drawn to materials that she finds 'useful' and able to control or change to fit her needs, rather than focusing on their contextural or monetary value as an art material. Layla builds with the interest of how the materials feel, connect and can be handled. A playful, and sometimes comical approach to form evolves naturally from the construction of the basic materials.

CRATE Graduate Project Space Award Artists: Verity Hime

  

VERITY HIME

In her work, Verity pursues the idea of the self-portrait, without using an image of herself.  Her most recent works have turned to cataloguing, a recurring tool that began due to her obsession with the organisation and cleaning of her surroundings and possessions.
Previous works have focused on capturing physical time and organisation via colour, size or topic.

Her latest work focused on her time spent at University. Cataloguing the contents of the rented room she lived in whilst studying; including a collection of new items including a bonsai tree, a collection of old items including a copy of To Kill A Mockingbird and a collection of presents including 18 empty Nutella jars. In doing this was the hope to create a time capsule of her university life.

Erin Laurel Hayhow & Dream Safari: STRANGE R

Saturday 22nd August - Sunday 13th September 2015
Preview: Friday 21st August
Open: Friday-Sunday, 12pm - 4pm

Engaging with themes surrounding  identity and social identification, Erin Laurel Hayhow and Sam Giles will be occupying Crate to bring their work together, in an investigation of social cultures, both prominent and sidelined.

Dream Safari presents interactive wall pieces that allow visitors to produce compositions through their physical interaction with tribal imagery, whilst Erin Laurel Hayhow creates immersive digital installations that highlight the fragility of cognitive function. and it’s deterioration. 

Both artists are based in Whitstable and have graduated from Fine Art Degrees in the last three years.

This exhibition comes as a commission from Margate Festival: Tribes and is funded by Turner Contemporary, Dreamland and Kent County Council.


 

 

Sophie Dixon: TIME PRESSURE DECAY

Saturday 15 - Sunday 16 August, 2015, 11am - 5pm

Inspired by her recent residency in the former mining town of Lens, Northern France,Time Pressure Decay is an exhibition by Sophie Dixon of photography, text and research. This coincides with a screening of her latest film 'La Mort De L'Arbre' at Turner Contemporary.

Resonating with the story of the Kent coalfields, the exhibition explores memories of the coal mining industry and the physical traces left upon the landscape. Drawing connections between seemingly disparate fragments of experience, video and text interweave to examine the unifying power of memory.

Dixon's work is rooted in extensive historical, social and cultural research. Concerned with the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction, she deconstructs and expands narratives to explore the tenuous relationship between ourselves and the environments in which we live.

Using personal research and writing as a narrative backbone, her work is less interested in portraying a historic truth than in exploring the deep connections between events across time - an attempt to open up the spaces between the experience of an event, and our later interpretations of it.

In 2014 she was awarded the CVAN Platform Graduate Award and has recently undertaken residencies with Mission Louvre-Lens Tourisme in Northern France and the UK based artists group Blast Theory.

CRATE Graduate Project Space Award

For three weeks CRATE was occupied by three recently graduated BA Fine Art Students from University of the Creative Arts, Canterbury.

">Layla Moore">Madeline Jones">Verity Hime

Graduates received mentoring sessions with Leigh Clarke, Benedict Drew, Matthew de Pulford and Trish Scott, as well as being supported on-site by Charley Vines and the Programming Team.

There was intermittent public access to the space, including "INTERRUPTION", a projection/collage event on the 3rd October, where participants were invited to bring materials to create immersive and playful outcomes.

The three weeks culminated in a public opening on 10th October, demonstrate the function of the CRATE project spaces, as a site for both work, play and display.

The award is designed as a means for a brief but valuable point between the structures offered within education and independent practice.

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Photo: Madeline Jones

Leigh Clarke: A HIGHER CANNIBALISM

Events: Thursday 16 July, 6-9pm & Saturday 18 July, 12-4pm
Open: July 17, 23, 24 and 31 & 1 August, 12-4pm. (Or by appointment)

Alongside the CRATE building, LIMBO Space is hosting Dreamlandia, a solo exhibition by David Price with the same opening and private view times.  

For those who are visiting Margate for the day, the Turner Contemporary is hosting Provincial Punk by Grayson Perry and the new Dreamland Vintage Amusement park will be open.

The title of this solo exhibition by the artist Leigh Clarke is borrowed from Rudyard Kipling who described the process of psychoanalysis as ‘ The Higher Cannibalism’.  The project will exhibit new works generated from over 500 popular autobiographies bought in charity shops that Clarke has collected, dissected and altered to make digital prints, etchings, screen prints and collages.

On mass, the collection and combination of the spines confront the viewer with a visual registry of role models that shape contemporary Britain society and question the consumption of popular autobiographies in times of austerity. Clarke plays with the scale of the book spines to measure the importance of celebrity and who is worthy or unworthy of an autobiography. In his method of appropriation, he treats each autobiography spine equally with paint and printing ink, resulting in monochromatic picture plains that remove hierarchies and status.  The exhibition is perfectly located in the CRATE project space, which is an old print works in the centre of Margate. 

About the artist:

Leigh Clarke is engaged in a multidisciplinary print practice that employs mass manufactured objects or mass disseminated text to make singular political statements. His concern with public engagement has led him to curate projects at Lokaal 01 in Breda, The London College of Communication and Extrapool in Nijmegen. In 2012 he was selected for the London Open at the Whitechapel Gallery where he exhibited 30 plaster casts on scaffold poles of the negative spaces within political latex fancy dress masks. In 2014 he took part in a major residency project In Stoke-on-Trent hosted by Airspace Gallery and funded by the Arts Council England and the Esme Fairbairn Foundation. This summer he has been commissioned to work with Create London to generate alternative maps for the River Lea in the East End of London. Clarke is a Senior Lecturer in Printmaking and Illustration at the London College of Communication and Printmaking Tutor at the Royal Academy Schools.

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