Projects

COME ON, CRAIG, GET UP / … IT DOESN'T MOVE AT ALL, IT'S FROZEN IN SPACE

Saturday April 8, 201, 2-6pm 

A collaboration between Jack Lavender and Matthew de Pulford.
With works, performances and instructions from:
Helena de Pulford, James Howard, Nicholas Mortimer, Trish Scott,  

With thanks to Scott King and Jeremy Deller

Lizzy Rose: ARRANGEMENT

Exhibition and workshop postponed due to ill health - new dates to follow soon

A layer of living moss forms an indoor landscape in Lizzy Rose’s new audio-visual installation at CRATE.
Incorporating video, sound, hand-made objects and manipulated plant-life, the work explores landscape, form, nostalgia and the pursuit of knowledge between cultures.

Lizzy Rose visited Japan in 2016 to research a form of floristry called Ikebana which has been practised for over 600 years. Rose's interest lies in the hidden culture surrounding this art form, which she examines by drawing parallels between The Art of Flower Arranging, a book produced in the 1950's, and the classes held today in Tokyo by the Ohara School of Ikebana for International students.

The Art of Flower Arranging by Ishimoto is a instructional guide on how to use the simplified principles of Ikebana to decorate your home. Ishimoto encourages the user to observe nature and landscape. Pure Ikebana is more precise, combining geometry and natural forms; the wildness of nature meeting rational aesthetics. By replicating landscape it aims to create a transformative space that evokes the sublime, which is described as a kind of spirituality, or sacred place.

Alongside the exhibition there will be an opportunity to take part in a workshop creating your arrangement from nature. This will be a free workshop. Time and venue to be confirmed. The exhibition was funded by the Arts Council, The Great Britain Saskawa Foundation and CRATE.

About the artist:
Lizzy Rose (b. 1988) is a British artist who lives and works in Margate. Her work explores community, British identity and hidden culture. She has a severe form of Crohns disease. She studied at Central Saint Martins' School of Art and Design. Lizzy Rose was part of artist-led space, LIMBO in Margate from 2012-15 and now is part of the programming team at CRATE.

lizzyrose.co.uk

#arrangementmargate

Harry Chapman: DOUBLE PARALLEL

Wednesday 23 November 2016, 5-9pm

CRATE is pleased to present a new work by artist Harry Chapman to kick-off a series of related events that fall somewhere between offering a methodology and means to re-think the positivised 'full-presence' of the performing body, especially when our current social life is being put to work constantly without value.

Double Parallel is a looped projection work predicated on the axiomatic function of moving-image – being both recorded and played back at the same speed. The material of the work is therefore its composition, rather than the time and space which passes for its content.

As a principle or score, Double Parallel maintains a paradoxical relation to the site at CRATE - in which it is both autonomous and contingent on any given future realisation.

To the extent that this work is concerned with an immediate relation between its realisation and its exhibition, its material is synonymous with that of performance; with the difference that it consists entirely of its own documentation.

About the artist:
Since graduating in July 2012 Harry Chapman (b. 1988, graduated Central Saint Martins (BA Fine Art, 4D)) has worked on an independent basis between London and Europe. Whilst studying, the principal form of his work was performance - concerned in particular with non-mediated processes and simultaneity. During the time since graduating Chapman has realised a number of pieces of work on digital video, recorded directly to tape and played back from tape - as well as exhibiting some of his work at an independent space in central London (a.m., 10 Copperfield St.l, SE1 0EL). There is a direct (as opposed to implicit or biographical) relation between Chapman's earlier work in performance, the work on digital video tape, and more recent work made in relation to a score – as at CRATE.

Emma Gibson: SHELLING OUT

Preview: October 23, 7 - 9pm
October 24 - November 1, 2015

Part of an ongoing series of environments known as "The Other Room", this new exhibition by Emma Gibson uses a
backdrop of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics to pinpoint a turning of the tide, when things that
were once child's playthings on the beach came to have the price of jewels.

Conchlymania or ‘shell-lunacy’ in the 17th century referred to the hysteria around collecting, acquiring and dealing these ‘works of art from God’. 

Collections became declarations of wealth and faith (the gathering of shells on the beach coffered spiritual status) and the collectors themselves had surprising similarities to dealers and collectors of fine art today- both caring passionately for the status of possessing something strange and unusual from a distant land, preferably before anyone else.

Seashells are naturally occurring and no two shells are ever alike.

Presented inside this parallel universe are two areas, one Production and one Display. Using seashells and their complex and once extremely coveted natural beauty and mythology as a metaphor, it confronts how we consider value and originality today.It is up to you to decide on the origins and meaning of these shells and ultimately, if they have worth.

egibson.co.uk

Sophie Dixon: TIME PRESSURE DECAY

Saturday 15 - Sunday 16 August, 2015, 11am - 5pm

Inspired by her recent residency in the former mining town of Lens, Northern France,Time Pressure Decay is an exhibition by Sophie Dixon of photography, text and research. This coincides with a screening of her latest film 'La Mort De L'Arbre' at Turner Contemporary.

Resonating with the story of the Kent coalfields, the exhibition explores memories of the coal mining industry and the physical traces left upon the landscape. Drawing connections between seemingly disparate fragments of experience, video and text interweave to examine the unifying power of memory.

Dixon's work is rooted in extensive historical, social and cultural research. Concerned with the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction, she deconsructs and expands narratives to explore the tenuous relationship between ourselves and the environments in which we live.

Using personal research and writing as a narrative backbone, her work is less interested in portraying a historic truth than in exploring the deep connections between events across time - an attempt to open up the spaces between the experience of an event, and our later interpretations of it.

In 2014 she was awarded the CVAN Platform Graduate Award and has recently undertaken residencies with Mission Louvre-Lens Tourisme in Northern France and the UK based artists group Blast Theory.

sophie-dixon.com

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